Australian Carmenere wine regional and flavour profile Carmenere taste and aromas Cherry, raspberry, plum, and herbaceous notes with characteristics of smoke, spice and earthy notes, reminiscent of dark chocolate, tobacco, and leather. Believed to be extinct for centuries, Carménère truly came back from the dead in a story of confused identity. With less acid and smoother tannins than its counterparts, Carménère has the flavor profile to become a dominant and beloved grape by wine-drinkers. Carménère – Syrah wine is an innovative red blend that combines Chile's signature grape with Syrah, the Rhône's most celebrated export and a renowned cépage améliorateur (improver variety). Enjoy a Carmenere with anything from steak to BBQ, to red-sauce pasta. Part of the reason I love wine is that every grape has a story. While many different grape varieties have been brought back from obscurity in different periods of time, none have made such a fantastic reappearance as Carménère. “Unlike Cabernet Sauvignon or Syrah, Carmenere is a silky, dense, juicy wine, with almost imperceptible tannins. The Andes’ wines tended to be more floral with great length in the finish due to the heightened acidity. Another keen benefit is Carménère’s herbaceous peppercorn-like flavor that often embellishes roasted meats (from chicken to beef). It was not until 24 November, 1994, that French ampelographer Jean Michel Boursiquot identified Carménère vines, previously thought to be Merlot, growing in Viña Carmen’s Alto Maipo vineyards. There are several produces in Chile making wine from 100% Carmenere. The soils are clayish of volcanic origin, colluvial and decomposed rocky substratum. Carmenere wine is a deep red wine. On the higher end, the herbaceous, bitter notes depart the scene in favor of sweet berries, refined light tannin, and a bittersweet note, like cocoa powder. Carmenère definition is - a full-bodied red varietal wine produced especially in Chile; also : the grape from which the wine is made. It is very similar to Merlot. Carmenere wine reviews, Carmenere wine notes, LCBO, BCLDB, and SAQ inventory availability and wine tasting notes for Carmenere. In a single-vintage tasting of Carménère wines across all regions and quality levels, we identified a few key highlights you’ll want to note: A quick reference wheel for identifying wine aromas. It is possible that the variety name is an alias for what is actually the Vidure, a local Bordeaux name for a Ca… History Carménère was born, like a majority of the world’s prominent grapes, in the French wine region of Bordeaux. It’s a savory wine that has just a hint of bitterness at the end, making it ideal for dishes involving meat. Carménère is a medium to full-bodied dry red wine with aromas of tobacco, leather, dark fruit, coffee, bell pepper, and chocolate. This case of mistaken identity is perhaps what saved Carménère from extinction when Phylloxera devastated the vineyards of Bordeaux in the late 1800’s. Learn about the characteristics of this wine to find a favorite. Still, make a note of the keen matches to try with Carménère below: A selection of several of Chile’s most well-known Carménère producers. Acidity gives Carménère a nice ring to it; it’s a great wine to wake up your senses. Carménère has one, and it’s worth hearing. Carménère wine has a deep red color and aromas found in red fruits, spices and berries. Although it originates in France, the conditions were simply not harsh enough for this grape to achieve the fullness of its expression. Cabernet Sauvignon – Carménère is a blend of two dark red grape varieties … However, China has vast planting of Carmenere, which could eventually number more planted hectares than Chile. Carmenère is a medium to full-bodied red wine with a herbal edge that makes it a versatile match with a wide range of foods. The wine is treasured for its supple red-and-black berry flavors (in a similar style to Merlot) and herbaceous green peppercorn notes. Carménère was born, like a majority of the world’s prominent grapes, in the French wine region of Bordeaux. Next Round Live: What's Happening in the Drinks Industry Now. There are several produces in Chile making wine from 100% Carmenere. International Carmenere Day is celebrated every November 24. Whether it be that the grape has been native to an area for centuries (like Sangiovese in Tuscany), or found to be the love child of some other popular grapes (Cabernet Sauvignon is the illegitimate kid of Cabernet … Carmenere naturally matches well with smoked, grilled or … One of the most ancient European varieties, Carménère is thought to be the antecedent of other better-known varieties; some consider the grape to be "a long-established clone of Cabernet Sauvignon." It is also known as Grande Vidure. Here are my favourite pairings. Carménère makes an excellent everyday food pairing wine for several reasons. The Carménère vines were planted around the valleys of Santiago. Carmenere produces full-bodied, deep-colored wine when fully ripened, and herbaceous wine with hints of green pepper when picked too early. The best rated wines typically have boosted alcohol ranges in between 14.5–15% ABV and easily resemble fine Bordeaux or Cabernet Sauvignon (with softer, more gentle tannins). I find Chilean wines generally provide a great combo of quality and value, and their Carménère tends to be smooth, warm and rich, with sweet, dark fruit and chocolate flavours. Carménère, one of the six noble red grapes allowed in Bordeaux wines, was long forgotten and thought to be extinct. Chile is located on the western coast of South America, but its topography creates something akin to a pseudo-island, isolating its vineyards from the elements. Carmenere, outside of Chile is hard to find. Carmenère is a medium to full-bodied red wine with a herbal edge that makes it a versatile match with a wide range of foods. (Pro tip: you get what you pay for when it comes to Carménère. A good wine should have a good story. As with all wines, you get what you pay for, but you won't go wrong with the excellent Carménère wines made by Chile’s Concha y Tora winery. Carmenere isn't the only kind of wine you can find from Chile. As noted earlier, Carmenere comes in several styles, but the most common one is ripe and spicy dark red fruit with a soft, velvet texture on the palate and with accents of black pepper, possibly smoke and tar, or herbs and green pepper. Unbeknownst to many people for years, including the Chileans that first removed the cuttings from Bordeaux, the result was the establishment of Carménère in Chile and the avoidance of complete extinction due to phylloxera. Following the Phylloxera plague of 1857 that wiped out a majority of Europe’s grapes, Carménère was considered extinct. Whether it be that the grape has been native to an area for centuries (like Sangiovese in Tuscany), or found to be the love child of some other popular grapes (Cabernet Sauvignon is the illegitimate kid of Cabernet … This vineyard, 25 years old, is close to the Andes Mountains near San Clemente. Quality Carménère from this area is somewhat lighter with lovely floral notes of cherry, hibiscus, and rose with a subtle petrichor/granite-like minerality.

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